Author Archives: Geula Twersky

Sulam Yaakov

Jacob’s ladder is seen with angels cloaked in talitot (prayer shawls) blessing Jacob using the text of the priestly blessing, which culminates with peace. “Shalom” forms the rungs of the ladder representing G-d’s promise to protect Israel and return them to the Land of Israel in peace. The promise to Jacob at Beit El is reenacted with every priestly blessing.

Chag HaSigd

For thousands of years Ethiopian Jews preserved an Jewish ancient holiday mentioned in the book of Ezra, called Chag Hasigd, or the holiday of prayer. This holiday is celebrated fifty days after Yom Kippur, and is ushered in with fasting and prayer for the return to Jerusalem. In Etheopia, Jews gathered on a tall mountain and faced Jerusalem, as the Kessim, or Rabbis read from the Torah. Todah this holiday is celebrated in Jerusalem, overlooking the Temple mount.

Shemot

The famous scene of Holocaust survivors who reached Israel?s shores, displaying the numbers tattooed on their arms, is depicted here. In the painting the numbers are replaced with the words of the verse from Isaiah, “He who took them out in great numbers calls each one by his individual name.”

Menorah

The Menorah is seen rising above the arch of Titus, in celebration of the triumph of the Jewish people’s return to the Land of Israel. The old city of Jerusalem rises above the arch, and is illuminated up by the flames of the Menorah.

Kibbutz Galuyot

The arrival of Etheopian Jewry to the State of Israel is a fulfillment of the promise of the ingathering of the exiles. This painting contains the words of the prayer for Kibbutz Galuyot- the divine promise of return whose fulfillment we are meriting to see unfolding before our eyes.

Hoshanah Rabah

Hakafot, the tradition of walking around the Bima (Torah reading table) on the seventh day of the holiday of Succot is the theme of this painting. Participants carry the four species of the holiday, as they participate in the service which takes place at the Kotel. The refrain of the prayers uttered during this ceremony, “Anna Hashem Hoshiya Na” is seen embroidered on the Bima.

Har Habayit

The majesty and mystery of Temple mount is a reflection of the Revelation at Sinai. In this depiction, the beauty of the site of the Temple shines through a veil of mist. In the artist’s eye the obscuring mosque fades away to reveal the Temple mount in its pristine glory.

Degel Yisrael

Israel’s flag is represented in this painting by Jewish refugees from the Nazi Holocaust breaking the British blockade. The blue stripes of the deck frame the Holocaust victims who proudly display the star of David, which is worn not as a badge of shame, but as a medal of honor, representing the unique role that the survivors played in laying the foundation for the birth of the State of Israel. The Jewish star displayed by all of the immigrants becomes the symbol of our national pride.

Degel Yisrael

Israel’s flag is represented in this painting by Jewish refugees from the Nazi Holocaust breaking the British blockade. The blue stripes of the deck frame the Holocaust victims who proudly display the star of David, which is worn not as a badge of shame, but as a medal of honor, representing the unique role that the survivors played in laying the foundation for the birth of the State of Israel. The Jewish star displayed by all of the immigrants becomes the symbol of our national pride.

Kos Eliyahu

The return to Jerusalem and to The Temple Mount in 1967 is depicted in this painting. The deliverance by the hand of G-d is represented by the hand holding the ceremonial cup of blessing. Rav Goren is seen reflected in the cup with the Shofar and Torah scroll, ushering in the new era of “Veheveiti”. This is the cup of Eliyahu Hanavi, who will come to announce the arrival of the era of the redemption.

Bet Medrash Temani

In this depiction, there is a powerful tension between the physical poverty and spiritual wealth of these Yeminite scholars. Sitting barefoot on the floor and sharing scarce texts, they reflect the glory of the spiritual world of Torah that they are immersed in.

Agudah Achat (Sephardic Torah Reading)

Depicted in this painting is a large crowd assembled around the Torah during the festival of Succot. The four species are held by the worshipers, whose symbolism we are taught hints at the diversity and unity of Am Ysrael. All participants in the service wear unique Talitot and religious head gear, while listening to the reading of the Torah according to the Sephardic custom, in a celebration of Jewish cultural diversity.

Red Roof Tops

This aerial view of the breathtaking Yemin Moshe neighborhood in Jerusalem highlights the striking red roof tops which grace the homes in Israel. The Yemin Moshe neighborhood is named for its historic founder, Sir Moses Montefiore, and is famous for the windmill which stands in its center.

Torat Zion

The return to The Western Wall and to Jerusalem in 1967 is depicted in this painting as a liberating paratrooper embraces the wall. The wall becomes a Torah scroll, symbolizing the return to Zion as a return to the Torah and its laws. The famous verse from Isaiah decorates this scene, “For the word of G-d emanates from Zion.”

VeHeveti

The famous moment in 1967, when the IDF Paratroopers liberated Jerusalem and the Temple Mount, is seen in this painting. Rabbi Shlomo Goren, Chief Rabbi of the IDF at the time, is seen blowing a Shofar, reflected in the raised Kos Eliyahu, symbolizing the emergence of the Geula, redemption.

Havdalah

Two images are juxtaposed in the painting while they are united through the Havdalah theme. The paratroopers liberating the Western Wall are seen looking towards the image of Roman Vishniak?s “Vanished World.” The Holocaust era is seen as connected to the return to Jerusalem through flames- the holy flame of the Havdalah candle. The text of the Havdalah adorns the painting, and includes a deviation from the standard text: “Blessed is He who distinguishes between redemption and exile.”

Menorah

The Menorah is seen rising above the arch of Titus, in celebration of the triumph of the Jewish people’s return to the Land of Israel. The old city of Jerusalem rises above the arch, and is illuminated up by the flames of the Menorah.

Wildflowers of Israel

Iris, Sun’s-eye Tulip (Tzivoni) , Crocus (Kirkum), Pink sun-rose (Shimshon), Almond blossom (Shkedia), Rockrose Fruits (Lotem).
Sterbergia (Chalmonit), Eryngo (Charchavina), Egyptian Caper (Tsalaf Mitzri), Campion (Tzipornit), Groundsel (Savyon), Calla-lilly
Mountain-horned Poppy (Parga), Narcissus, Corn Poppy (Kallanit), Yellow Distaff-thistle (Churshaf), Creeping Lip plant (Lipia Zochelet), Sea Dafodiln (Chavatselet Hachof).

Yaffo Gate at Night

Shaar Yaffo is the gate most commonly used to access Jerusalem’s Ancient Old City. It is famous for the Crusader Fortress, Migdal David, which graces its entrance. Migdal David houses a museum which takes the visitor through the ages of Jerusalem’s rich history.

Ichud Yerushalayim

The liberation of the temple mount by Israeli paratroopers in 1967 ushered in the modern era of a reunified Jerusalem. The cherubs express the love that G-d and Israel share. They are seen atracting the attention of the paratroopers as they contemplate the return of the G-d of Israel and his people to the holy city.

Kotel Plaza

This panoramic scene depicting the Kotel plaza highlights the many different types of people who come to visit and pray at the Kotel, from chasidim, to modern, men and women, young and old. The six stars represent the six million who are memorialized at the Kotel plaza.